Music Theory Discussions

So… who wants to help me with my homework? This is Schubert’s “Des Mullers Blumen.” It’s in the key of A major, but according to my professor, it modulates to E briefly. So I have the pivot chord modulating to E, but I can’t figure out exactly where it goes back to A major. You can see where I have the red brackets and the arrow drawn— it’s somewhere in there. I’m also having trouble analyzing the chord that the arrow is directly pointing to. So… all help is welcomed!
(RH of piano is bass clef, just FYI)
—encantadaa View Larger

So… who wants to help me with my homework? This is Schubert’s “Des Mullers Blumen.” It’s in the key of A major, but according to my professor, it modulates to E briefly. So I have the pivot chord modulating to E, but I can’t figure out exactly where it goes back to A major. You can see where I have the red brackets and the arrow drawn— it’s somewhere in there. I’m also having trouble analyzing the chord that the arrow is directly pointing to. So… all help is welcomed!

(RH of piano is bass clef, just FYI)

encantadaa


What is your favorite chord progression to play on piano? from zackhasablog

My thing currently is chords with suspensions. A piece that I composed a while ago has what I think is a very nice chord progression which goes from i-V-i-V7/iv-iv-V-VI-V-i with some suspended thirds thrown in throughout.
I’ve also recently discovered the Vidal bass lines and those have some interesting chord progressions.

What does everyone else think?
-piano-soprano


I had just begun (trying) to learn how to resolve V7 chords in Harmony and I am a little confused. Please explain? It would help a lot! from Anonymous

For explanation purposes, pretend we’re in C major (& in closed position)

Root position

G moves to C

B moves to C

D moves to C

F moves to E

Producing a 1st inversion I chord with no fifth

First inversion: 

B moves to C

D moves to C

F moves to E

G carries over

Second inversion:

D moves to C

F moves to E

G carries over

B moves to C

Third inversion: 

F moves to E

G carries over

B & D resolve inward to C 
producing a 1st inversion with a doubled root

Hope this helps!
-piano-soprano


Can you give a brief idiot's explanation of modes? (Like phrygian and myxilodian?) from aennimtz

musicdiscussions:

The last time I did this, it sounded bizarre.  So we’ll see what happens

Modes are scales created from scales.  

Take the c major scale  (cdefgabc)

then start on the second note and go up an octave, while maintaining the key (defgabcd)

This gives you the dorian mode in this particular key(dorian of any key is starting on the 2nd scale degree)

To produce the other modes (lydian, mixolydian, phrygian, etc) you start on different scale degrees (phrygian is 3rd, lydian is 4th, mixolydian is 5th) and go up the octave while maintaining the key.  

I hope this makes sense.  

-piano-soprano


How do some songs on guitar have only a two-chord chord progression? Or even just the same chord for a whole verse?? Are there chords in the background maybe? Thanks! from stilll-falling

There are a lot of really good two-chord songs out there.  What makes them interesting is the texture, density, and orchestration juxtapositioned with the melody.  I’ve looked at examples in classical music of this very same phenomenon, but for the life of me, I can’t remember what piece it was.  However, a solid example of a two-chord song in pop music is Green Day’s “Oh Love.”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWwMqa-_210

The entire song is I and V, repeating from start to finish.


Hey, I'm new to the music community, and, well, I'm lost. I've taken an intro class for Music, but fundamentals are all I pretty much know. Where do I go from there? What things should I learn next? How do I improve further as a musician? from Anonymous

I’d go into something more advanced.  Try looking at voice-leading(if you haven’t already), and maybe some more advanced chords like augmented 6ths or the neopolitan.  Then try to find something that pertains to where you want to go as a musician.   Just explore some other things to “expand your theory horizons”.  

-piano-soprano